top of page
Search

Moth Week Baby!! National Moth Week - July 22-30, 2023

You have heard of shark week, but have you ever heard of moth week? The less subdued cousin to shark week but just as fascinating! Sure sharks are cool but they are also in the ocean and you would need diving gear to really see them. Moths on the other had are found in you own backyard and with a few supplies you may already have at home you can attract moths for you to photograph and nature journal!


To let you know how this started I will grab it directly from the website:


"National Moth Week was started in 2012 by members of the Friends of the East Brunswick Environmental Commission, a 501c3 not-for-profit organization in Central New Jersey dedicated to local environmental education and conservation. The idea grew out of the popular local moth nights organized by Dave Moskowitz and Liti Haramaty that attracted experienced and novice moth-ers of all ages. "


A citizen science endeavor to help count and document the butterflies nocturnal cousin. Moths are extremely interesting and don't get the same attention and love as their daytime counterparts. One of my favorite Lepidopterans (the Family that moths and butterflies belong to) is the Atlas moth. Although not found in Florida (except the Butterfly exhibit at the UF Museum of Natural History) these large moths have wings that look like snake heads when they are folded. Seriously, Google it, they are amazing. For Florida moths we have some amazing specimens. The hummingbird moth and Luna are two of my favorites. Want to set up a "trap" for moths? it can be super easy. If you have a white sheet and some sort of bright like source you can set up in your back yard. Set the sheet up vertically, shine the light on the sheet and sit back and wait. Please remember to take photographs and journal instead of taking specimens. Moths are having a hard time with all the light pollution, let's not take any out of the breeding populations.


You can also make a moth bait. This is Dave's recipe, it can be found on the moth week site:


1 overripe banana and/or a can of peaches in heavy syrup

A few ounces of dark rum (tasted beforehand to insure freshness)

A bottle of dark beer (tasted beforehand to insure freshness)

A box of dark brown sugar and/0r a bottle of dark molasses


Mash the banana and\or peaches so that they are in little pieces

Mix the remaining ingredients together with the mashed fruit (use a container with a large open mouth for ease of getting the paintbrush in and out)Put a tight lid on and leave in the sun for a few hours to a day.

Paint a 1 foot square area on tree trunks about 3 or 4 feet off the ground, the more trees the better.


My daughter and I did this. While we got a lot of male mosquitos (they don't drink blood) and very few moths it was a lot of fun.


A few tricks for sketching. Moths and butterflies do not spread their wings the way you see them when they are pinned. When pining a butterfly or moth you raise the forewings up above the head to you can see the fore and hind wing clearly. When alive they rest their wings below the head. Also make quick sketches and take pictures for later to add detail or for identification. If you see a Luna check out the face, they have no mouth parts!!!


Take photos and tag them #mothweek2023 and #mothweekCNA so I can see what you have hanging out near your house! Check out all the cool facts at:


https://nationalmothweek.org/














8 views1 comment

Recent Posts

See All

1 Comment


I'm not a fan of moths, but I do like your new blog header with the lime green (one of my favorite colors) background and flying heron.

Like
bottom of page